Wealth of Nations is a book by Adam Smith published in 1776, considered one of the most influential works in the history of economic thought and political philosophy. It is a treatise on political economy and a defense of laissez-faire economic ideas.
Here are some of the key points of The Wealth of Nations:
. The division of labor is the key to economic growth.
. Free trade benefits all countries involved.
. The government should play a limited role in the economy.
. The invisible hand of the market leads to the best allocation of resources.
The Wealth of Nations is a complex and challenging book, but it is also a rewarding one. It is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand he basic principles of economics and the free market system.
Here You can enter into Smith's thinking:
The invisible hand:
Third world countries should read this book. Same goes for Europe and USA
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Thank you for posting this. Lots of public references to this book in education / media mis-represent Smith's view of how markets work, esp in reference to cartels and competition. I spent years mis-misunderstanding this work before I finally read it myself! Nice one!
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What's left is a complete superficial interpretation of this great work and a reductiln to: the man who ''invented'' the theory of the ''invisible hand''.
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I remember studying it as part of the curriculum in uni. ... given it was imposed on me, I hated it .... although I remember it has value
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I read it by myself because german academia is dominated by Keynesian bs. To get education You are left alone
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In what universe can this book be claimed to be nearly-forgotten?
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Do You know someone that really read it? That You can talk about? Someone You can talk about econ theory of the 18th and 19th century?? Gratulations my friend
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Almost everyone who has an economics degree has read it, at least in abridgement, and many people with a passing interest in history or cultural studies. It would be hard to think of a more classic book in the social sciences.
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I studied it, too. Noone, at least in german universities, reads this. It's all keynesian bs they teach. But good for You!
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I have read it twice, but most recently 25 years ago. I agree it is complicated, but for a native English reader I found it clear and much easier to follow than I expected from a book written more than 200 years ago. Good post. Thanks
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Thank You. I downloaded a spanish version to profound my spanish that's horrible like my english. After my studies of Homer this will be part of my literature during my time at Crete. And a looooot of F. Nietzsche's unpublished stuff
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Your English is very good. As everyone knows we Americans can't handle more than one language, with a few exceptions
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Aaaah nooooo. It's horrible. Now after some years in Spain the terrible German accent mixes itself with spanish pronounciation. Like a trilingual homunculus
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