Think of complex carbohydrates as the long-term HODL in your diet, providing sustained energy through a gradual release. They're like the Bitcoin of nutrition, steadily fueling your body. On the flip side, simple carbohydrates are the quick trades, rapidly converting to energy like a swift transaction. Just like a diversified portfolio, a balanced diet embraces both types of carbohydrates for optimal nutritional gains.
Simple Carbohydrates:
Table sugar (sucrose): Found in various forms, such as granulated sugar, powdered sugar, and brown sugar. Fruits: Naturally occurring sugars in fruits, such as glucose in grapes and fructose in apples. Honey: A natural sweetener containing glucose and fructose. Maple syrup: Sweet syrup derived from maple trees, consisting of sucrose. Candy and sweets: Confectionery products often contain simple sugars like glucose, fructose, and sucrose.
Complex Carbohydrates:
Whole grains: Brown rice, quinoa, oats, barley, and whole wheat are rich in complex carbohydrates.
Legumes: Beans, lentils, and chickpeas provide complex carbohydrates along with fiber and protein.
Vegetables: Starchy vegetables like sweet potatoes, potatoes, and corn are good sources.
Whole wheat products: Bread, pasta, and cereals made from whole wheat contain complex carbohydrates.
Brown rice: A whole grain that offers complex carbohydrates and additional nutrients.
It's worth noting that complex carbohydrates generally provide more sustained energy due to their slower digestion and absorption compared to simple carbohydrates, which are quickly converted into glucose in the bloodstream. A balanced diet includes a mix of both types of carbohydrates for optimal nutrition.
Types of Whole-grain Carbohydrates:
Quinoa: A versatile grain that is high in protein and contains all essential amino acids.
Brown Rice: A less processed alternative to white rice, retaining its bran and germ layers.
Oats: Rich in fiber and known to help lower cholesterol levels.
Barley: A hearty grain with a nutty flavor, often used in soups and stews.
Buckwheat: Despite its name, buckwheat is not related to wheat and is gluten-free. It is used in products like soba noodles.
Farro: An ancient wheat grain with a chewy texture, often used in salads and soups.
Millet: A small, gluten-free grain with a slightly sweet flavor.
Whole Wheat: Includes the entire wheat kernel, providing more nutrients than refined wheat.
Bulgur: A quick-cooking form of whole wheat, commonly used in salads and pilafs.
Spelt: An ancient grain related to wheat, known for its nutty flavor.
Freekeh: A roasted green wheat with a smoky flavor, commonly used in Middle Eastern dishes.
Teff: A tiny grain native to Ethiopia, often used in injera, a type of flatbread.
Incorporating a variety of these whole grains into your diet can contribute to a well-rounded and nutritious eating plan.
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As a retired professional endurance athlete, I salute this post. So much meat only retardation in the Bitcoin world.
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Eat all the fucking meat you can.. WEF will make you eat ze bugs
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Throw some chocolate on it and I'll eat a bug lol
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Actually chocolate is full of bugs. Many people dont know this. But they are full of roaches.. I dont have a problem with eating bugs. My problem is with the ability to choose from
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they are full of roaches
šŸ˜¬ souce?
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You have plenty..
Cocoa beans are not treated individually for bugs.. so, as we eat industrial shit, a lot of roaches go inside the mix.. not cool..
Still eat chocolate though
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Hope we can resist that.. Morroco is not so far.. no pigs, but a lot of lamb
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But to be honest with you, I used to be extremely low carb myself until I learn more about nutrition and realize that I was making myself miss out on a whole food group just because I didn't understand nutrition.
However they are easier to overeat on because they're so good but to gain weight you need to be in a calorie surplus to lose it you must be in a deficit. Simple as that. Consistency is the hard part.
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Carbs are so yummy. Life is too short to restrict yourself to dogma.
Everything in moderation unless you have diabetes.
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Exactly šŸ’Æ
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True. Burn it off. "If the furnace is hot enough anything will burn even Big Mac's" Anyone know what book that is from?
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This is what worked for me! It was simple, I had to be in a deficit, no matter what I ate
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While it is true that you don't technically have to ingest carbs because your body makes what you need.
Carbohydrates are a macronutrient and low carb diets do not magically equate to more weight loss If calories are the same.
So why deprive yourself of all the carby goodness? lol
I find them particularly helpful during my runs and athletic endeavors like obstacle courses and training for them.
When you're running slow then your body can use oxygen to burn fat as fuel but whenever you're doing anaerobic activities like weightlifting and sprinting then you need carbs as a quick source of energy.
I have another article that I'll be posting soon that goes into the fuel sources during different levels of activity.
So all that to say is just account for carbs as part of your total calories and eat a balanced diet.
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Yeah I see what you mean.
I was about to hop on a call so I tried to post that real quick but I appreciate the constructive criticism!
I'm all about becoming the best version of myself and creating good content as part of that.
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Yeah I spent a lot more time on the first one.
I wish I could post videos here because I'm about to cover a lot of this stuff and short videos on my YouTube channel
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Disagree. Once your mitochondria are able to acclimate to burning fat more efficiently, carbs are unnecessary even for anaerobic activities.
I have had my own experience with this.
Shawn Baker also has lots of experience with this.
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You may become a little more efficient at it but it won't match the speed that your body can use carbs to get ATP.
The are just many more steps involved.
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Tell that to his world record row times.
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So, would you recommend remove most carbs from my diet and focus on protein?
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The best I ever felt and performed was eating 2lb of ribeye steak per day and nothing else. Just red meat and water.
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How fast is your 5K?
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Go compare dicks with someone else.
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That was irrelevant question for performance.
No.
Balanced diet rich in protein is what I follow.
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I like them both.
Typically when I shop I get the brown rice, the brown pasta, and the wheat tortillas.
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What is your educated opion around " carnivore " like diet
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It's an option.
I've tried it. I perform better on an omnivore diet.
I'll be posting more information soon on the different energy systems that the body uses.
The quickest source of energy that the body can produce to make ATP comes from carbohydrates.
There's a larger yield but it is more time-consuming and many more steps involved for the body to break down fat to get the ATP.
I was really into fasting and I still do intermittent fasting occasionally but I'm trying to bulk so I've been breaking my fast upon awakening with a vegan protein powder and almond milk.
The system by which when breaks down fat for ATP or energy can be made more efficient by going deep into a fast or by consuming a ketogenic diet.
I do not prefer a ketogenic diet either.
I've spent half a year on the Paleo diet and had very minimal carbohydrate. The carbohydrates that I did consume were complex.
When I'm sprinting and lifting heavy I can tell the difference and how I feel and perform when I have carbs in my bloodstream or glycogen in my muscles versus being on a 24 to 36 hour fast during which my body is burning mostly fats for energy.
My educated opinion and personal practice is to have a balanced diet rich in protein.
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